About Us

USDA Organic Certified ProductsWozupi is an organic farm committed to growing food in a way that nourishes the earth, the community, and people’s minds and bodies. The farm grows vegetables, herbs, and fruit, produces eggs and maple syrup, and uses honeybees to pollinate the plants. All Wozupi produce and eggs are USDA-certified organic.

Wozupi is owned and operated by the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community, a federally recognized, sovereign Native American tribe located southwest of Minneapolis/St. Paul. Since opening in 2010, Wozupi, which means “garden” in the Dakota Language, has encompassed the tribe’s focus on being a good neighbor, good employer, and good steward of the earth..

What We Do

Vegetables Wozupi grows open-pollinated, certified-organic produce, culinary herb varieties, and plant starts. We are committed to building our soils through crop rotation, cover crops, and compost, which are imperative to growing organic, nutrient-dense produce.

Orchard Managing a certified-organic orchard, Wozupi grows a variety of native fruits, including juneberries, elderberries, chokecherries, and wild plums, as well as a dozen varieties of apples and pears.

Native Edible Plants Our farm is dedicated to growing meaningful quantities of edible native plants. These plants include tinsina (prairie turnip), mdo (ground nut), and psin (wild onions).

Honeybees The Community’s abundance of floral resources support Wozupi’s native bees and honeybees. These bees gather pollen and nectar from the flowers on our fruits, vegetables, and herbs to feed their families. In doing so, they pollinate what we grow.

Sugarbush The SMSC hosts small portions of the great sugar maple forest that once grew in this area. The forest has been providing sap that has been boiled down to maple sugar for generations. Wozupi continues this tradition by producing maple syrup.

Chickens Chickens are pastured at Wozupi year-round, reducing pests and adding soil fertility. Their diet includes pasture plants and insects, organic chicken feed, and the farm’s produce waste, which produces delicious eggs high in omega-3 fatty acids.